25 Homemade Coffee Creamers and Syrups (without the nasty additives)

25 Homemade Coffee Creamers and Syrups (without the nasty additives)

Do you love coffee or know someone who does? ‘Tis the season for the fanciest possible version of everything, and your hot beverage is no exception.

Places like Starbucks have taken flavored coffees to  whole new level. At my local grocery store, there’s an entire refrigerated unit dedicated to decadent flavored creamers. Unfortunately, those creamers are rife with chemicals, including artificial flavors and neurotoxins like aspartame and sucralose.  You certainly aren’t giving someone a “treat” by putting that stuff in their coffee. Here’s the list of ingredients for Coffeemate’s Hazelnut Creamer:

WATER, SUGAR, PARTIALLY HYDROGENATED SOYBEAN AND/OR COTTONSEED OIL, AND LESS THAN 2% OF SODIUM CASEINATE (A MILK DERIVATIVE)**, MONO- AND DIGLYCERIDES, DIPOTASSIUM PHOSPHATE, COLOR ADDED, CELLULOSE GEL, NATURAL AND ARTIFICIAL FLAVORS, CELLULOSE GUM, CARRAGEENAN, DEXTROSE.

Sooooo….there’s no actual cream involved, nor is there any hazelnut mentioned in that chemistry project.  Yum.

Here’s some great news, though: If you possess the ability to heat milk and use measuring spoons and a whisk, the fanciest flavors around can be yours, and at a fraction of the price of the artificial grocery store versions.

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6 Reasons to Start Using Coconut Oil as Toothpaste

6 Reasons to Start Using Coconut Oil as Toothpaste

In a study to test coconut oil’s biocidal properties against the bacteria responsible for tooth decay, the oil proved to be quite effective.

The action of coconut oil was tested in its natural state and after being treated with enzymes, in a process similar to digestion. The oils were tested against strains of Streptococcus bacteria, which are common inhabitants of your mouth.

They found that enzyme-modified coconut oil strongly inhibits the growth of most strains of Streptococcus bacteria, including Streptococcus mutans, an acid-producing bacterium that is a major cause of tooth decay.1 It is thought that the breaking down of the fatty coconut oil by the enzymes turns it into acids, which are toxic to certain bacteria.2 Chief researcher Dr. Damien Brady said:

“Incorporating enzyme-modified coconut oil into dental hygiene products would be an attractive alternative to chemical additives, particularly as it works at relatively low concentrations. Also, with increasing antibiotic resistance, it is important that we turn our attention to new ways to combat microbial infection.”

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10 Amazing Coconut Oil Beauty Swaps

10 Amazing Coconut Oil Beauty Swaps

Coconut oil is one of the most popular natural ingredients around at the moment with an endless list of benefits. Incorporating it into your hair and body care regime is just one of the ways in which you could benefit from its amazing qualities.

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